Tuesday, 18 June 2019
logo
Up-to-the-minute perspectives on defence, security and peace
issues from and for policy makers and opinion leaders.
        



dv-header-dday
     |      View our Twitter page at twitter.com/defenceredbox     |     

Olivier GuittaFour years ago, with the attacks in France, homegrown terrorism sprung at the forefront of the news in Europe. People started realising that the wave of jihadist attacks was carried out by individuals born and bred on the continent. Radicalisation had gone largely ignored and led in some cases to extreme violence. While the number of potential terrorists registered by countries such as the United Kingdom and France has alarmingly swelled to 30,000, the radicalisation phenomenon has also continued to spread in Europe, writes Olivier Guitta..

At the source of this radicalisation are very well-funded, extremely well-organised Islamist movements. For example, Salafism has expanded in Europe recently: from Belgium, where the federal state security agency has listed more than 100 Salafist organisations active in the country to France where the number of Salafist mosques has grown from 15 in 1990 to 60 in 2015 to 130 in 2018. Sweden is not spared as well, according to the report "Between Salafism and Salafi Jihadism", the number of Islamist extremists over the past decade there has grown tenfold, from 200 to 2,000. Salafism is one of the main sources of the spreading of violent Islamism in a number of Swedish cities. (more on page 2)

April 2019

Vice Admiral Nick Hine CB previously Assistant CHief of the Naval Staff Policy appointed Second Sea Lord and Deputy Chief of Naval Staff

11 March 2019

Air Commodore I D Gale MBE to be promoted Air Vice-Marshal and to be Assistant Chief of Air Staff in the Ministry of Defence with effect from 17 April 2019 in succession to Air Vice-Marshal G M D Mayhew CBE whose appointment as Deputy Commander Operations and Air Member for Operations has previously been announced.

Group Captain M W Smith OBE to be Commander Joint Intelligence Training Group and Joint Forces Command Chicksands in May 2019 in succession to Group Captain S S Stirrat.

20th FEBRUARY
Air Vice-Marshal S C Gray CB OBE to be promoted Air Marshal and to be Director General Defence Safety Authority in the Ministry of Defence with effect from 29 March 2019 in succession to Lieutenant General R F P Felton CBE.

Air Vice-Marshal G M D Mayhew CBE to be promoted Air Marshal and to be Deputy Commander Operations, Headquarters Air Command and Air Member for Operations with effect from 3 May 2019 in succession to Air Marshal S D Atha CB DSO who is retiring from the Service.

Air Vice-Marshal A M Turner CB CBE to be promoted Air Marshal and to be Deputy Commander Capability, Headquarters Air Command and Air Member for Personnel and Capability with effect from 23 May 2019 in succession to Air Marshal M Wigston CBE whose appointment as Chief of the Air Staff has previously been announced.

Air Commodore D G Bradshaw to be Assistant Chief of Staff Capability Delivery Combat Air, Headquarters Air Command in April 2019 in succession to Air Commodore L S Taylor OBE whose next appointment is yet to be announced.

Air Commodore R P Barrow CBE to be Assistant Chief of Staff Capability Delivery C2ISR, Headquarters Air Command in May 2019 in succession to Air Commodore I D Gale MBE whose next appointment is yet to be announced.

Air Commodore R J Dennis OBE to be Deputy Chief of Staff Support, Headquarters Allied Air Command, Ramstein with effect from 16 September 2019.

Acting Air Commodore D S Arthurton OBE was promoted Air Commodore on 11 February 2019 and is appointed Lightning Force Commander, Royal Air Force Marham in July 2019 in succession to Air Commodore D G Bradshaw.

Group Captain D P Manning to be promoted Air Commodore and to be Assistant Commandant (Air & Space) at the Joint Services Command & Staff College Shrivenham in June 2019 in succession to Air Commodore S M Miller whose appointment as Air Officer Force Protection, Force Protection Force Commander and Commandant General Royal Air Force Regiment has previously been announced.

Group Captain S A Marshall to be promoted Air Commodore and to be Commandant Royal Air Force College Cranwell in November 2019 in succession to Air Commodore P J M Squires OBE ADC whose next appointment is yet to be announced.

Group Captain J P Nixon to be Commandant No 3 Flying Training School, Royal Air Force Cranwell in December 2019 in succession to Group Captain E P Moriarty.

17th JANUARY
Air Marshal M Wigston CBE to be promoted Air Chief Marshal and to be Chief of the Air Staff and Aide de Camp to Her Majesty The Queen in July 2019 in succession to Air Chief Marshal Sir Stephen Hillier KCB CBE DFC ADC who is retiring from the Service.

Air Vice-Marshal G Tunnicliffe to be Deputy Commandant Royal College of Defence Studies with effect from 26 April 2019 in succession to Rear Admiral J M L Kingwell CBE.

Air Commodore A K Gillespie CBE to be promoted Air Vice-Marshal and to be Air Officer Commanding No 2 Group in September 2019 in succession to Air Vice-Marshal D J E Cooper CBE whose next appointment is yet to be announced.

Group Captain P J Warwick CBE to be promoted Acting Air Commodore and to undertake Defence Attaché training with effect from 4 March 2019.

 

And top echelon commanders apointed which we haven't previously recorded (December 2018)

Vice Admiral Tony Radakin CB is to be promoted Admiral and appointed First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff, in succession to Admiral Sir Philip Jones.

Vice Admiral Timothy Fraser CB is to be promoted Admiral and appointed Vice Chief of the Defence Staff, in succession to General Gordon Messenger;

Air Marshal Michael Wigston CBE is to be promoted Air Chief Marshal and appointed as Chief of the Air Staff, in succession to Air Chief Marshal Sir Steven Hillier;
Lieutenant General Patrick Sanders CBE, DSO is to be promoted General and appointed Commander Joint Forces Command, in succession to General Sir Christopher Deverell.


Greg RowettThe bizarre online hubs and the role they play in the online information and culture wars, by Greg Rowett of the Institute of Statecraft

"If your opponent is of choleric temper, seek to irritate him" – Sun Tzu.

Information warfare is not the flashiest, most glamorous, form of war. This paper was originally a briefing to the U K Defence Forum, aiming to cover the fundamental concept and highlight some of the key challenges faced by the West in responding to infowar, and how information warfare has evolved in recent decades. It's a perfect storm, and quite possibly, an existential threat to democracy.

USA00000IMG 00000 BURST20190107130637518 COVERNATO has dilemma is of its own making. It is overextended. George Kennan had warnedd NATO’s expansion was a "strategic blunder of potentially epic proportions.” Deceiving Russia on NATO expansion, alienating Russia’s political elite across the political spectrum, expanding NATO to Russia’s borders and to within 100 miles of St. Petersburg, ensured Russia would upgrade and expand its military capabilities. Treating Russia as a threat resulted in Russia becoming a threat. The result: Instead of providing NATO with a straight, flat route to Moscow, the European Plain now provides Russia with a straight, flat route to the west – to Kiev, Riga, Tallinn, and beyond, writes Joseph E Fallon.

MoDIMG 20181218 1521345 2Military appointments in the Queen's Birthday Honours list for 2019 are shown on the next page

ED-ESPthumbnailAlgeria is undergoing a transformation that might lead either to a true political transition or simply to a change of regime. Since the departure of Bouteflika, the regime's margin to manoeuvre has increased a bit, but the people seem to believe that the president's resignation was a way for his clan to gain time to install a successor close to it. The ruling powers are still in control and they do not want to hand over the power to the new Algerian generation until they will be satisfied with a compromise candidate. In the background the Algerian Army is protecting its unrelenting political dominance, says Mariano Garcia Munoz.

olivier2When it comes to terrorism, the 22nd of May is a black day for the United Kingdom. Indeed, first in 2013, soldier Lee Rigby was savagely murdered by two jihadists in Woolwich, writes Olivier Giutta of Globsec

Then in 2017, one jihadist, the British-Libyan 23-year-old Salman Abedi, affiliated to the terror group Islamic State (ISIS) stormed into the Manchester Arena and waited for concertgoers to exit after the end of American pop sensation Ariana Grande to detonate his bomb killing 22. ISIS had called for attacks on concert halls over the summer of 2015 then the Bataclan attack took place in Paris on 13 November 2015. ISIS had also time and again called for attacks against Western children. The Manchester Arena suicide attack was clearly disgustingly targeting kids and teenagers.

 

USA00000IMG 00000 BURST20190107130637518 COVERThe UK interned substantial numbers of enemy aliens in the two World Wars.The internment of people of Japanese descent in the USA is well known (if often exaggerated) Little is known, and is becoming less so, about the internment by the USA of people of European descent - none of whom were subsequently compensated. The USA put pressure Latin American countries to expel similar people, including Jews who were sent to the Third Reich. On the next page Joseph E Fallon, U K Defence Forum Research Associate, explains how this chapter of history is disappearing into a "memory hole".

memorial2 nWe mark on the next page the passing of those who have served this country. Contributions from comrades and families welcome.

More Articles...

Latest from the Ministry of Defence

Cookies
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies on the Defence Viewpoints website. However, if you would like to, you can modify your browser so that it notifies you when cookies are sent to it or you can refuse cookies altogether. You can also delete cookies that have already been set. You may wish to visit www.aboutcookies.org which contains comprehensive information on how to do this on a wide variety of desktop browsers. Please note that you will lose some features and functionality on this website if you choose to disable cookies. For example, you may not be able to link into our Twitter feed, which gives up to the minute perspectives on defence and security matters.