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Round-up by Elayne Jude Great North News Service

As of 1 September, the US is known to have carried out 31 airstrikes against AQAP in Yemen so far this year; one in January, six in March, six more in April, nine in May, two in June, one in July, and five in August. Other recent airstrikes are also believed to have been carried out by the US, but little evidence has emerged to directly link the attacks to the US.


Since December 2009, the CIA and the US military's Joint Special Operations Command are known to have conducted at least 46 air and missile strikes inside Yemen, including 1 September strike.

Strikes continued in North Waziristan, at unpredictable intervals.

1 September - North Waziristan. Six 'militants' dead. Four missiles hit a compound and a vehicle in Degan in North Waziristan. Two more were wounded. The exact target of the strike has not been disclosed. No senior al Qaeda or allied jihadist commanders from foreign terrorist groups are reported to have been killed in the strike.

Two senior jihadist leaders are reported to have been killed in drone strikes in North Waziristan last week, although their deaths have not been confirmed. Badruddin Haqqani, a top leader in the al Qaeda-linked Haqqani Network, is thought to have been killed. Afghan Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid and a Haqqani Network spokesman denied reports that claimed Badruddin was killed, and said he "is in the country and he is occupied with his operational responsibilities." Afghan, Pakistani, and US intelligence officials have said that Badruddin is dead.

Emeti Yakuf, who is also known as Abdul Shakoor Turkistani, may have been killed in the Aug. 24strike in the Shawal Valley, that hit a training camp. Yakuf directs al Qaeda operations in Pakistan's tribal areas.

September 2 - Yemen. Five AQAP fighters killed near Rada'a. On the day that the death of Batis was confirmed in a strike on August 31, another strike hit AQAP in Yemen. Yemeni officials initially said that the strike killed five suspected AQAP fighters as they traveled in the town of Rada'a, a city in Baydah province that was under AQAP control earlier this year. Yemeni tribal leaders in Rada'a claimed that 13 civilians were killed.

The exact target of today's strike has not been disclosed; no senior AQAP leaders have been reported killed in the attack.

September 5 - Six "Islamist militants" killed in Hadramout. Today's strike on a compound is the fourth in Yemen in eight days.

Eight missiles were fired at a compound in the Wadi al Ain area of Hadramout province, killing six AQAP operatives. The exact target of today's strike has not been disclosed; no senior AQAP leaders have been reported killed in the attack. The large number of missiles fired at the target indicates the US was hunting a senior AQAP leader or an important operative. A later report identified Said al Shihri, a former Guantanamo detainee and the current deputy emir of al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, as one of the dead.

The strike is the second this month. On Sept. 2, 13 civilians were killed in a failed strike that targeted a vehicle transporting AQAP fighters in Rada'a in Baydah province.

US drones have zeroed in on Hadramout province over the past month.

September 22 - North Waziristan. Three 'militants' killed in the first strike in Pakistan in three weeks.

hit a vehicle as it was traveling in the Datta Khel area of in North Waziristan, according to AFP. Pakistani officials said that three "militants" were killed.

The exact target of the strike has not been disclosed. No senior al Qaeda or allied jihadist commanders from foreign terrorist groups are reported to have been killed in the strike.

The Datta Khel area is administered by Hafiz Gul Bahadar, the Taliban commander for North Waziristan. Bahadar provides shelter to top al Qaeda leaders as well as terrorists from numerous Pakistani and Central Asian terror groups.

September 24 - North Waziristan. Five 'militants' killed in Mir Ali. In the third attack in the area, several missiles were fired at a compound in the village of Khaderkhail in the Mir Ali area. Pakistani officials said that five "militants" were killed.

The exact target of the strike has not been disclosed. No senior al Qaeda or allied jihadist commanders from foreign terrorist groups are reported to have been killed in the strike.

The exact target of the strike has not been disclosed. No senior al Qaeda or allied jihadist commanders from foreign terrorist groups were reported to have been killed in the strike. The following day Abu Kasha al Iraqi, an al Qaeda leader who serves as a key link to the Taliban and supports al Qaeda's external operations network, and Fateh al Turki, a previously unidentified leader, were said by Pakistani intelligence officials, Taliban commanders to have been killed.

The area is in the sphere of influence of Abu Kasha al Iraqi, an al Qaeda leader who serves as a key link to the Taliban and supports al Qaeda's external operations network. Taliban leader Hafiz Gul Bahadar and the Haqqani Network also operate in the Mir Ali area.
Since Sept. 8, 2010, several Germans and Britons have been reported killed in strikes in the area. The Europeans were members of the Islamic Jihad Group (IJG), an al Qaeda affiliate based in the vicinity. The IJG members are believed to have been involved in an al Qaeda plot that targeted several major European cities and was modeled after the terror assault on the Indian city of Mumbai in 2008.

With thanks to The Long War Journal in particular 

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