Wednesday, 15 August 2018
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inmemoriam

Private Kevin Elliott
The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland

It is with sadness that the Ministry of Defence has confirmed the death of Private Kevin Elliott of The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland.

He was killed as a result of an explosion believed to have been caused by a rocket-propelled grenade when he was attacked by insurgents whilst patrolling on foot in Babaji District, Helmand Province on the morning of Monday 31 August 2009.


Private Kevin Elliott, aged 24 from Dundee, of The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, attended Braeview Academy in Dundee where he was a keen boxer and footballer. He joined the Army in 2002.

After basic training he was posted to Bravo Company, later moving to Charlie (Fire Support) Company. He had previously served in Iraq and Northern Ireland.

Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Cartwright, Commanding Officer of The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland said:

"Pte Elliott was an awesome fighting Jock, who was very much in his comfort zone here on demanding operations in Afghanistan. He lived his life one day at a time and it is fair to say that he did not especially enjoy 'peacetime soldiering' - like many a Jock that has gone before, he was a lovable rogue.

"He was on the verge of leaving the Army earlier this year, but his inclination to be in the thick of the action was too tempting and he caught the last transport to Afghanistan with his mates. He loved operations and he was a big team player.

"It was no surprise to hear that in this tragic incident, he was the first man on the roof in the defensive position, the first to volunteer to protect his colleagues in a dangerous area. That sums up the man; he took life seriously when it was important to do so, and he was a first class field soldier as a result. He would never let his friends down.

"Pte Elliott's loss will be hard to accept by all who knew him well. We will not forget his sacrifice, giving his life protecting his friends, representing his Regiment and his country, and so that the people of Afghanistan might have a better future.

"We offer our deepest thoughts and condolences to his family and friends and that they might gain some strength that he has died in the service of others, doing a professional job that he loved."

Captain Harry Gladstone, Fire Support Group Commander said:

"Pte Kev Elliott was a unique soldier. He was excellent in the field and had a brilliant sense of humour. He was naturally fit and most importantly he was very loyal to his friends. Pte Elliott died in tragic circumstances doing what he loved.

"I remember talking him shortly before we left Inverness to deploy to Afghanistan in March. He was dressed in his civilian clothes, having been de-kitted, and about to walk out of Fort George back to civilian life when he decided to sign back on. When asked why he decided to sign back on he simply said "I didn't want to miss the boys." This comment sums up his attitude to the army.

"My last memory of him is seeing him overjoyed having heard that he had been chosen to go as part of a Javelin Detachment to support A Company, rather than sitting in camp.

"The guy loved having fun, and lived life to the full. He leaves two brothers Craig and Thomas, and his two sisters Natasha and Kirsty. Our thoughts are also with his mum Maggie and his grandmother Margaret. We remember him for his sense of humour and all that he contributed to Battalion life."

Warrant Officer Class Two Andy Lambert, Company Sergeant Major Charlie (Fire Support) Company:

"Pte Elliott was every Company Sergeant Major's nightmare in camp but a great soldier in the field on operations. Kev was partial to the odd beer or two in the UK and had an eye for the girls.

"Rest in Peace Kev, you have gone but will never be forgotten by the boys of Charlie Company."

Private Peter Fenton, Fire Support Group gunner said:

"Kev was cheeky but you couldn't get annoyed with him. He was always able to get a laugh in any situation. He would bend over backwards to make sure everyone was alright.

"He was hilarious, confident, loyal, and above all charming. His loss will leave a big hole in the Platoon."

Private Kyle Russell, Fire Support Group gunner said:

"A story typical of Kev was on having a room inspection in Fort George, the Platoon Sergeant opened the fridge to see it full of beer. He told Kev to get rid of it; Kev proceeded to drink the contents of the fridge in front of him and continued for the rest of the night.

"Kev was kind and generous – he lived for the moment. If you asked for a fag, he threw you a packet of twenty. He was a terrible singer but my fondest memory of him was sitting in the back of a vehicle screaming out the words to 'I got you babe' at the top of his voice."

Lance Corporal Ian Bruce, Fire Support Group gunner:

"Kev was a poser – he loved his body – but underneath he cared deeply about the other people in the Platoon. He would try and wind people up but you couldn't get annoyed with him, he was too nice. He wanted to be active the entire time.

"He loved being in Afghanistan and had booked a holiday to Australia for our return. He also wanted a pair of white socks to walk down Dundee High Street pulling the birds! We will all miss him badly.

"NEMO ME IMPUNE LACESSIT."

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British military casualties - Editorial policy

In the service of our country.

Eulogies for all personnel killed on UK operations in Afghanistan, Iraq and elsewhere are posted as soon as they have been released by the UK Ministry of Defence. Each eulogy we publish for men down in operations brings a lump to the throat. We are losing the best of the best. Politicians must ensure that, when the newspaper cuttings have faded, their sacrifice has had some meaning, has helped bring about a good result. Anything else would be a waste for which they will be eternally condemned.

There is invariably at least a 24 hour gap between the official release of news of an event and the naming of the dead. This is to allow families to be informed and proper eulogoies to be produced. Occasionally families request no euologies or comment. We abide by guidance we receive on such sensitive matters. We regret that information on those who sacrifice almost as much through grave injury is seldom released by the MoD for operational reasons, and so we are unable to pay tribute.

 

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